A New Mexican in Florida-Part VI

Faithful readers may recall my unhappiness at driving by a small neighborhood lake without stopping one morning at the Space Coast Birding and Wildlife Festival. (See A New Mexican in Florida-Part III.) I had made a note of the location in a Titusville, Florida neighborhood where the lake was located, and I returned one morning with Donna and Melanie. Dawn and Jeff joined us there. There were over 100 Black-bellied Whistling Ducks at the lake.

Raft of Black-bellied Whistling Ducks

Raft of Black-bellied Whistling Ducks

One of the neighbors saw us and came over to chat with us. He said that a pair of Black-bellied Whistling Ducks first appeared at the pond several years ago. He started feeding the ducks, and more ducks joined the first pair. He estimated that there were now over 100 ducks staying at the pond. There were occasional Roseate Spoonbills, White Ibis, Wood Storks and Anhinga.

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks and friends.

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks and friends.

A Juvenile White Ibis bathes in the lake.

A Juvenile White Ibis bathes in the lake.

A friendly retired minister and his lovely wife strolled up and told us that they had lived in the neighborhood for over 40 years. The ducks often slept in their backyard under a large tree.

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks sleeping under a tree in a neighborhood yard.

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks sleeping under a tree in a neighborhood yard.

Because this was a small lake in a neighborhood, we were able to get quite close to the Roseate Spoonbills.

Roseate Spoonbills

Roseate Spoonbills

Roseate Spoonbills, White Ibis, Black-bellied Whistling Ducks.

Roseate Spoonbills, White Ibis, Black-bellied Whistling Ducks.

Roseate Spoonbill prepares for flight.

Roseate Spoonbill prepares for flight.

It was a lovely morning, and we sat on the bank of the lake, enjoying the sun and watching the birds.

Black-bellied Whistling Duck flies toward the island in the middle of the lake.

Black-bellied Whistling Duck flies toward the island in the middle of the lake.

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks march up onto the island in the middle of the lake.

The Black-bellied Whistling Ducks are named for the whistling noise that they make, and I made a video of them whistling. Unfortunately the lake is right next to I-95 so you can hear a great deal of traffic noise, but you can still hear the ducks.

If you are wondering what happened to Part V of this Florida series, you will find it over at my Photo Flurries blog.

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6 Comments

Filed under Florida birds

6 responses to “A New Mexican in Florida-Part VI

  1. BirdGalAlcatraz

    Absolutely splendid, Linda! I’m so glad you had a great time in Florida and that you got these lovely photos to share. Sweet!

  2. I love the wading ducks–they look like me, not sure if it’s warm enough to get in. Great photos of a nice lake.

  3. Jenny Sanderlin

    I have been totally enjoying your blog and photos!! Without leaving my apt, I can get a glimpse of the birds in other parts of the country, as well as the different habitats.
    Thank you so much. I found you from a post of Birdspot.

    {{Smiles and grateful enthusiasm}}

    Jenny

    • Thanks Jenny. I’m always pleased to have a new reader. :) I really enjoyed my trip to Florida. I hope to get out this weekend so I can start posting photos of New Mexico birds again next week. Birdspot is the best! She came to visit me in December prior to her Tahiti/Hawai’i trip. She’s truly a lovely person!

  4. Wonderful Florida images! That pond was a great find. Always a pleasure to view your fantastic blog!

  5. Thanks Jann, Joan and Julie for your comments. That neighborhood pond was a lovely place and the neighbors were just wonderful! I was fortunate to be able to spend some time there. :)

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